New Classic Rock Stream Streaming Now

Hard Rock Radio Live is excited to Launch New Classic Rock Stream….. Classic Rock has made way for us to create a exciting mind-blowing classic stream, which we named Classic Rock. Tune in and check out the newest addition to our Hard Rock Radio Live family. “Classic Rock” Music That Doesn’t Suck streaming 24 hours a day 7 days a week! Here is our pop up player Click on Play.

New Kick Ass Stream- “Metal Chaos”

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New year and a new exciting Metal Stream… Hard Rock Radio Live is excited to Launch Metal Chaos…. Liquid Metal has made way for us to create a exciting mind-blowing metal stream, which we named Metal Chaos. Awesome programming of liquid metal combined with  addtional styles of metal. Tune in and check out the newest addition to our Hard Rock Radio Live family. “Metal Chaos” Music That Doesn’t Suck streaming 24 hours a day 7 days a week! Here is our pop up player Metal Chaos Stream

Watch ALICE IN CHAINS' Entire Concert At Majestic Theatre In San Antonio, Texas

Watch ALICE IN CHAINS' Entire Concert At Majestic Theatre In San Antonio, Texas

Fan-filmed video footage of ALICE IN CHAINS‘ entire September 27 performance at Majestic Theatre in San Antonio, Texas can be seen below.

The band’s setlist was as follows:

01. Hollow
02. Them Bones
03. Dam That River
04. Again
05. Check My Brain
06. Nutshell
07. Angry Chair
08. Man In The Box
09. Your Decision
10. Down In A Hole
11. Stone
12. We Die Young
13. It Ain’t Like That
14. Got Me Wrong
15. Sludge Factory

Encore:

16. Rooster
17. No Excuses
18. Would?

ALICE IN CHAINS, who opened the first five shows on GUNS N’ ROSES‘ summer North American stadium tour, is now on a headlining trek that brings the group to Scottsdale, Arizona on Friday (September 30).

ALICE IN CHAINS singer William DuVall told the WRIF radio station in June that it was “too early” to talk about the band’s new music, despite the fact that it’s been more than three years since the release of their last studio album.

“The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here” came out in 2013 was the band’s second disc with DuVall, who joined in 2006 following the 2002 death of original vocalist Layne Staley.

William also talked about ALICE IN CHAINS‘ songwriting process and how it has evolved over the years. He said: “We make a habit of kind of starting pretty much with a clean slate every time we’ve gone in. And that challenges you, so we’ll have to see how it manifests this time. But we’re not there yet.”

“The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here” sold 62,000 copies in its first week of release.

aliceinchainssanantonioposter2016
Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
Watch ALICE IN CHAINS' Entire Concert At Majestic Theatre In San Antonio, Texas
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

JANE'S ADDICTION's DAVE NAVARRO Signs With UNITED TALENT AGENCY

JANE'S ADDICTION's DAVE NAVARRO Signs With UNITED TALENT AGENCY

According to Billboard, JANE’S ADDICTION guitarist Dave Navarro has signed with United Talent Agency (UTA) in all areas.

JANE’S ADDICTION, which has broken up and reunited several times since forming in 1985, released its fourth studio album, “The Great Escape Artist”, in 2011 and a concert album/DVD called “Live In NYC” in 2013.

JANE’S ADDICTION has been touring to celebrate the 25th anniversary of its 1990 album “Ritual De Lo Habitual”. The band performed the album in its entirety on the trek.

Navarro is at the center of a new documentary called “Mourning Son”, which focuses on the true story of what happened to Navarro‘s mother and the repercussions of her death. The film was written by Navarro and director Todd Newman, and was produced by Navarro, Newman and Larissa Swan.

The film is described as a “heartbreaking, inspirational journey” in which Navarro “confronts the events that changed his life forever.”

Great meeting at UTA today. Nobody came, but it was great anyway…

A photo posted by Dave Navarro (@davenavarro) on Jun 6, 2016 at 6:10pm PDT

Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
JANE'S ADDICTION's DAVE NAVARRO Signs With UNITED TALENT AGENCY
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

DISTURBED Frontman Says People Are Too Quick To Demonize Music Streaming Services

DISTURBED Frontman Says People Are Too Quick To Demonize Music Streaming Services

DISTURBED singer David Draiman, who has been a vocal supporter of Spotify for years, says that people are too quick to demonize streaming services for the paltry payments they pay out to music rightsholders.

The most popular subscription service, Spotify reportedly has more than 100 million users, 40 million of whom pay for monthly plans while the rest get advertising along with their music.

Spotify pays out around 55 percent of its revenue to labels, a simplified number due to the complexity of the contracts and additional payments made to publishers.

Commenting on the fact that many artists have complained about how little Spotify pays them, Draiman told “The Jasta Show” podcast (hear audio below): “It’s a simple thing. It comes down to very, very basic principles. The question is, for your individual recording contracts, with whomever you’re signed with, what is your digital royalty rate? If it’s treated a license, that’s a 50-50 split. If it’s treated like however they want to go ahead and put it your fine print, and they’re giving you 0.04 percent of what they’re taking, well, then you can only blame yourself for not reading the contract, number one. Number two, the biggest problem is that when streaming services make deals with record labels, they make deals based on their entire catalog. So any label will license their entire catalog for, let’s say, ten million dollars. And over the course of that year, it only generates five million worth of spins. What happens to the other five million? They keep it. And it doesn’t go to the artists and it doesn’t go back to the streaming service. The record label pockets that. So all of that additional revenue that is pulled out unnecessarily, because it’s unjustified, right? — ’cause it should be spin per spin, right? — instead they say, ‘Hey, our catalog is gonna be worth ‘X’ in the next year, give us this.’ They are forced to agree to it, because it’s the only way they can legally stream the stuff on their platforms. And that’s why, if you just saw, and if you look at every single record label’s bottom line, digital has become the bulk of their profit margin, or leading towards profit. Warner Bros. just issued a statement this past quarter where it’s the smallest loss they’ve seen in years, and they’re going more and more into the positive, because of what they are generating from digital and streaming services. So it’s not that there isn’t money to be made. The issue is, take a look at your recording contracts, make sure you know what you’re getting, and whether we like it or not, streaming isn’t the big demon here; YouTube is the big demon. When you’re being paid a sixth of what a streaming rate would be, and they’re claiming that they’re giving you all the bang for your buck because of exposure when you’re the reason why people are going ahead and advertising, that’s the criminality.”

He continued: “The industry is creeping — and, unfortunately, it’s a creep — slowly, slowly towards finally making this whole digital concept a little bit more transparent; they’re gonna have to, one way or the other, eventually. When they do, just for accounting purposes, for data collection purposes, because that’s what ninety percent of these things end up being — big data plays — they’re gonna end up having to be accountable.

“Look, the Irving Azoffs of the world, the big heavy hitters of the world, are pushing us forward in that direction. I applaud Nikki Sixx and the guys from SIXX:A.M. for taking a strong stance on the YouTube issue. There are a number of people out there who are doing it right. But people are very quick to demonize streaming services. Spotify and entities like it were created to directly combat piracy. Piracy is the issue, and that’s what people are forgetting. It’s almost like the media is putting so much hype on these paltry royalty rates, when, in truth, at least there is a royalty rate. You get nothing from piracy — absolutely nothing — and you have an entire generation of fans that have been raised to think that that’s okay, when it still isn’t.”

Draiman added: “All of these streaming services are still — and Spotify in particular — seventy percent of their proceeds are going back towards license holders. License holders — that’s the key. But not only that. You can’t look at streaming as something that’s supposed to replace physical sales. Physical sales are done; they’re done. In two years, you won’t see records in stores anymore, period. The CD will be as extinct as the VHS tape just became recently; it’s just a matter of time. So the entire environment has shifted. The industry is finally adjusting towards it. It’s a painful adjustment period, it’s gonna take time, but it’ll get there, and whether we like it or not, the revenue stream will never be the same. So we need to then re-approach things, simply deal with the status quo, try and make these royalty percentages better, more in our favor, be smart about the recording contracts you are signing, pay attention to the fine print, and make sure you know what you’re doing. Start maximizing your touring, start maximizing your merch. You need to view streaming the same that we’ve always viewed publishing. Same thing — you are being paid per spin, not per sale. It’s not the same thing. So streaming royalties are not a whole lot different than publishing royalties. Physical sales may simply no longer be something we can count on, and that is a very hard pill to swallow.”

Spotify brought in a whopping $2.18 billion in revenues in 2015, while net losses stood at $194 million.

The company’s payouts to the music industry (categorized as “royalty, distribution and other costs”) reached $1.83 billion in 2015 — up 85 percent year-on-year.

DISTURBED‘s sixth studio album, “Immortalized “, was officially certified gold on September 23 by the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) for sales of more than 500,000 copies. The certification came seven months after RIAA started including on-demand audio and video streams and a track sale equivalent in gold and platinum album award.

“Immortalized” features DISTURBED‘s version of “The Sound Of Silence”, which has been a huge hit for the band. Paul Simon shared his approval of it publicly after watching the band perform the song on “Conan” and also exchanging e-mails with Draiman.

DISTURBED‘s record label, Warner Bros., credited the song’s popularity to the video for “Silence”, which was released in December 2015. To date, the clip has been seen more than 110 million times, a record number of views on YouTube for the group.

“Immortalized” was released in August 2015. The effort became the band’s fifth LP in a row to enter the chart at No. 1 — a feat shared only with METALLICA and DAVE MATTHEWS BAND.

Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
DISTURBED Frontman Says People Are Too Quick To Demonize Music Streaming Services
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

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