Foo Fighters Announce Glastonbury Headline Gig at Secret Show

Foo Fighters Announce Glastonbury Headline Gig at Secret Show

During a surprise show in Somerset, England, Foo Fighters announced they will be one of the headliners at this year’s Glastonbury festival.

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Source: HRRL Classic Rock News via ultimate Classic Rock
Foo Fighters Announce Glastonbury Headline Gig at Secret Show
HRRL Classic Rock News via ultimate Classic Rock

DAVE MUSTAINE Says He 'Didn't Care' About METALLICA's 'Master Of Puppets' Being Played At GRAMMY AWARDS

DAVE MUSTAINE Says He 'Didn't Care' About METALLICA's 'Master Of Puppets' Being Played At GRAMMY AWARDS

Dave Mustaine says that he “didn’t care” that the house band played the song “Master Of Puppets” from his former band METALLICA when MEGADETH was honored with its first-ever Grammy on February 12.

MEGADETH was nominated for a 2017 Grammy Award for “Best Metal Performance” for the title track of “Dystopia”. This marked the band’s twelfth Grammy nomination in this category (including nominations in the discontinued “Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance” category).

Asked by Grammy.com what it was like winning his first award, Mustaine said: “It was really exciting. We were all sitting in a row, and when Margaret Cho [one of the pre-telecast hosts] had said, ‘Dystopia’, we were all ready to hear ‘M_’ [for MEGADETH], and she went ‘D_’ [for ‘Dystopia’], and I think it kind of faked all of us out for a little while. And then after she said ‘Dystopia’ and said ‘MEGADETH‘ really loud, I was, like, ‘Oh my God! We got it.’ So I remember standing up and being pretty excited.”

He continued: “It was a long way from our seat to the stage, and a lot of people are making a big deal about the house band playing a METALLICA song. I don’t care. I didn’t care at all. It was about the award. I thought winning the award was great.”

Mustaine added: “I wish that there would have been more time so that the [other] guys [in MEGADETH] could have had something to say too, but I know they’re all gonna get their chance to say whatever they wanna say about winning the award.”

Mustaine was fired from METALLICA in 1983 — some three years before “Master Of Puppets” was released — over substance abuse and anger issues. Although he later conceded that he was “bitter” for a period of time after being dismissed, he insisted that any perceived feud with his former bandmates was an illusion.

Mustaine recently told Radio.com that he “didn’t even notice” “Master Of Puppets” being played as he walked toward the stage to give his acceptance speech. “It just sounded like some music in the background,” he said. “The funny thing is that when I went back and listened to my acceptance speech, and I heard the song, I was, like, ‘Wow!’ Everyone was asking me, ‘What about the METALLICA thing?’ And I said, ‘I didn’t hear it, I just saw it.’ ‘How could you not have heard it?’ I didn’t know what they were talking about. I thought that they were talking about METALLICA‘s performance. Because we split [after the pre-televised awards]. By the time they did their thing with Lady Gaga, we were across the street eating dinner. So I went back and listened to my acceptance speech and I went, ‘Wow!'”

He continued: “I didn’t mind them playing it at all, it’s a house band, and they’re doing cover songs. They were probably saying, ‘We don’t know any MEGADETH songs. How about if we do a METALLICA song?’ But when I went back and listened to it, I was, like, ‘Oh my God! That’s the worst version of ‘Master Of Puppets’ I’ve ever heard in my life!'”

When the interviewer pointed out to Mustaine that the house “house band seemed to be playing pretty random songs,” Mustaine agreed: “They could’ve done a Cyndi Lauper song! [Laughs] I was just happy to be up there. It’s about being recognized.”
The members of METALLICA have been mostly respectful while discussing their onetime member, with guitarist Kirk Hammett saying on a podcast last fall: “I’ve always seen Dave as someone who was just really, really sad, really angry, really frustrated about his situation with METALLICA, and he never could let that go. And, you know, I’ve always shown a lot of empathy for him, understanding that he was just pissed off. It’s the equivalent of the woman of your life leaving you.”

MEGADETH recently completed a month-long U.S. tour with AMON AMARTH, SUICIDAL TENDENCIES, METAL CHURCH and BUTCHER BABIES.

Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
DAVE MUSTAINE Says He 'Didn't Care' About METALLICA's 'Master Of Puppets' Being Played At GRAMMY AWARDS
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

ANTHRAX Bassist: 'When Art And Business Get Together, They're Oil And Water'

ANTHRAX Bassist: 'When Art And Business Get Together, They're Oil And Water'

On February 19, Holland’s FaceCulture conducted an interview with ANTHRAX singer Joey Belladonna and bassist Frank Bello. You can watch the chat in two parts below. A couple of excerpts follow (transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET).

On what they would attribute ANTHRAX‘s longevity to:

Frank: “Love for music. I don’t know… just love for a good song. I just think we know we work well together, and people like what we do.”

Joey: “And we’re musicians that wanna be good at what we do. That’s the strive even for me, and I’m sure for Frankie — to be really good and to be able to show somebody that this is what we… You know, we’re artists and we wanna show you what we’ve got and how we perform.”

Frank: “Strive to be the best we can be. Do our best. That’s all we can do. And if people react to it, that’s great. We just wanna write the best song, be the best live band we could, and hopefully people bring something home from that. Hopefully it inspires new bands. I mean, it’s like that — you pass the torch and all that. It’s important.”

Joey: “And we love music. Music is the biggest thing about the whole thing. Being into music so deeply that you can do this a lot.”

Frank: “If something we do can inspire the next great riff or the next great band or whatever, the young-band generation, man? Go for it. We love that.”

On mixing music with business:

Frank: “Like everything else, the business sucks.”

Joey: “That’s a whole another thing.”

Frank: “When art and business get together, they’re oil and water — they separate. And you have to learn how to really negotiate through the business to get to the art. It’s really hard after a while, but after a while, I guess you get a coldness to you. You have to… This is business, this is art. You have to separate them. But one has to work with the other; it does.”

On how being a professional musicial in 2017 is different from how it was thirty years ago:

Joey: “Oh, it’s really different now. At least we can connect to home. That’s really one of the biggest things. Or you can just entertain yourself in different ways and at least commincate. That’s one of the bigger things for me, I guess.”

Frank: “Thankfully, with this technology, we can call our kids and stuff like that at home and talk to our wives, blah blah blah. On the other side, the music business is completely different. Illegal downloading killed record sales — killed it. Unless you’re Adele. But that’s the truth. And you have to stay on the road, as we do. We’ve always been on the road, but now there’s so many bands, the only way they can make it go and make it work is to stay on the road now. That’s just the way life is now, because the [people involved in the] music business haven’t figured out how to make money on records. I mean, some people do — the biggest of the big — and even them, they’re not even selling as much as they used to. But then there’s always Adele.”

ANTHRAX‘s February 15 concert at the Barrowland in Glasgow, United Kingdom was filmed for a DVD, to be released later this year via Megaforce. Seventeen cameras, including five GoPros and a full-size camera crane, captured more than two hours of ANTHRAX favorites that were voted onto the evening’s set list by fans and included “Madhouse”, “Be All, End All”, “Breathing Lightning” and “A.I.R.”, followed by ANTHRAX‘s classic 1987 album “Among The Living” performed start to finish. In addition to the live footage, the DVD will include “fly-on-the-wall” interviews and other B-roll shot on the band’s tour bus, backstage, in hotels and elsewhere.

The DVD is being produced and directed by Paul Green of the Manchester, U.K.-based Paul Green Productions who has filmed concerts for OPETH, THE DAMNED, Gary Numan, THE LEVELLERS and many others.

ANTHRAX played its last “Among The Kings” U.K. date last Friday (February 17) in Norwich and has headed to 22 European cities, winding up in Paris on March 16.

Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
ANTHRAX Bassist: 'When Art And Business Get Together, They're Oil And Water'
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

OVERKILL Singer On Writing Lyrics: 'I Like To Cleanse My Sins Of The Prior Year And A Half'

OVERKILL Singer On Writing Lyrics: 'I Like To Cleanse My Sins Of The Prior Year And A Half'

Aniruddh “Andrew” Bansal of Metal Assault recently conducted an interview with vocalist Bobby “Blitz” Ellsworth of New Jersey thrash metal veterans OVERKILL. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Metal Assault: I think [the new OVERKILL album “The Grinding Wheel”] has a more epic feel and there are longer songs, but in a good way. It’s more dynamic. The overall length of the album is also more than the last few. Why do you think it came out like that?

Blitz: “You’re correct. I think in the OVERKILL school, saying that you don’t give a shit really frees you up. When somebody says, ‘You realize that’s seven and a half minutes?’ I don’t give a shit, it sounds right. [Laughs] I think that works, because if it’s right, it’s right. There’s a great feeling when we’re doing a record that we have nothing to lose. That’s what makes it dangerous and gives it a sense of reality that encompasses the whole project. So, going in there and thinking with regards to time and length only takes that sense away from you. What we were doing was writing good songs and trying to separate them based on the emotions we felt while doing so. When there was a punky feeling, we pushed it on to a song like ‘Goddamn Trouble’. When there was a heavy groove coming, we pushed it. When it was straight-out thrash, we wrote ‘Our Finest Hour’. ‘The Grinding Wheel’ [the title track] is where we pushed the epic vibe. So, there was separation between all the songs, and then a larger separation. Now at the end of the day, stamping the OVERKILL brand on it, we made something that has diversity.”

Metal Assault: And the fact that you’ve been able to put out an album every two years also must free you up and put less pressure on you, because it’s not like you’re putting out an album for the first time in seven, eight years where everything depends on it, and what if people don’t like it, and that kind of thing.

Blitz: “Yeah, this works for us. This is what gives us visibility. We’re not on everyone’s lips until we’re touring, or we’re on a festival, or we’re releasing a record. We understand that. There’s never been an identity crisis here with regard to what our popularity is, or who we are. So, I think when we work on our schedule, it’s better when we’re working than when we’re not. It keeps our visibility up, and at the same time keeps us on a schedule where we can actually do something to improve ourselves, even eighteen records down the road.”

Metal Assault: In terms of the lyrical content, do you try to write it all fresh for an album, or sometimes do you go back into your own archives or vaults where you might find something that you haven’t used yet?

Blitz: “Well, obviously, repetition can be a bad word here, and there’s a fine line between style and repetition. I try to dance that tight rope. I don’t necessarily like to repeat myself. I like to cleanse my sins of the prior year and a half, or the experiences I’ve had, and sing about things I know about in abstract, interesting type of ways. Probably the thing I know most about in my life is what’s been introduced to me through this band. I don’t voice political feelings or principles that I have, and I stay away from social issues a lot of the time. But I do speak about the band, about the community, the principles we have and how they can be applied to life, or at least how I apply them to my life. ‘The Grinding Wheel’ is obviously about work. It’s about understanding work. Work hard and you’ll be the happiest guy in your house, that kind of thing. That’s really worked out for me. I know I’m not what I was when I was 22, but I can accept and embrace that.”

Read the entire interview at Metal Assault.

overkillgrindingwheelcd
Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
OVERKILL Singer On Writing Lyrics: 'I Like To Cleanse My Sins Of The Prior Year And A Half'
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

SEPULTURA Guitarist: 'I Don't Think You Can Ever Be Afraid To Risk Your Own Art'

SEPULTURA Guitarist: 'I Don't Think You Can Ever Be Afraid To Risk Your Own Art'

Rob Lyon of Hi-Fi Way: The Pop Chronicles recently conducted an interview with guitarist Andreas Kisser of Brazilian/American metallers SEPULTURA. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Hi-Fi Way: The Pop Chronicles: How would describe [the new SEPULTURA album] “Machine Messiah” and how does it compare to the rest of the discography?

Andreas: “Well, it feels like a new chapter, especially in the last thirty years. The last two years, we have spent touring playing lots festival and visiting new places and it felt like we had been celebrating the last thirty years. We played a lot of songs that we haven’t played in a long time and it is great to look back and see how beautiful our career has been. It feels great now that after the celebrations it felt like the time was right to do something new. That is why we changed producers and really use our musicianship at the highest level to the best that we can. We incorporated a lot of new elements in to the recording, and it was exciting with everyone bringing in new possibilities in to the mix. The band tried a lot of things and explored everything. I think that is the secret to SEPULTURA and why we are still here. We have a great set up with the label and the album release and it is hard not to be excited with everything that is going on in SEPULTURA.”

Hi-Fi Way: The Pop Chronicles: Can you put the change in sound down to anything in particular? Experience? Influences? Or is it that the way it happened organically?

Andreas: “I think it is an actual evolution. We are almost on stage every day, and if you look at how many shows we have played in the last three years and the places we have visited, [it] gives us the opportunity to collect new information, interests and ideas which is really motivating so when we go in to the studio we can try out a few things. Every time that we perform the old songs, we tackle them with a different attitude to push them to higher limits. I like to think of it as the artist Pablo Picasso. If Picasso followed the rules to go a certain direction because of tradition and everything, would that have given him new possibilities? I don’t think you can ever be afraid to risk your own art, or otherwise we would be copying or producing something that would have already been done before.”

Hi-Fi Way: The Pop Chronicles: What sorts of problems did you encounter in making “Machine Messiah”?

Andreas: “Nah, man, it was great, and we didn’t have any problems that stopped the recording. We didn’t need any psychiatrist in the studio or anything! We were all very focused and heading in the same direction. It was a lot of work, but also a lot of fun. It was never easy, as it was a very demanding album to record. That was one of our biggest challenges, but we did prepare ourselves physically and mentally to be ready to record, to express, to enjoy which is very important. To be in the studio for five months and to get a point of view across, it was important for us to be happy and on the same page. Recording in Sweden and having full support is amazing and preparing ourselves for the hard work made the process easier.”

Read the entire interview at Hi-Fi Way: The Pop Chronicles.

Source: HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net
SEPULTURA Guitarist: 'I Don't Think You Can Ever Be Afraid To Risk Your Own Art'
HRRL News Feed via Blabbermouth.net

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